Free Essays

Death Penalty Discussion
annon Is the Death Penalty Right or Wrong? The idea of putting another human to death is hard to completely fathom. The physical mechanics involved in the act of execution are easy to grasp, but the emotions involved in carrying out a death sentence on another person, regardless of how much they deserve it, is beyond my own understanding. I know it must be painful, dehumanizing, and sickening. However, this act is sometimes necessary and it is our responsibility as a society to see that it is d...

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Capital punishment, Law, Penology, Social policy, Philosophy of law, Politics, Capital punishment debate in the United States, Catholic Church and capital punishment
In the past three decades, steroids has been becom
ing a serious problem more than ever in the athletic field. Steroids are anabolic drug "to build" growth hormones that include the androgens (male sex hormones) principally testosterone and estrogen and progestogens (female sex hormones). Steroids were first developed for medical purposes. They\'re used in controlling inflammation, strengthening weakened hearts, preventing conception, and alleviating symptoms of arthritis and asthma. Unfortunately research has shown that steroids have been abuse...

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Endocrine system, Sex hormones, Sports, Androstanes, Exercise physiology, Behavior, Anabolic steroid, Bodybuilding, Steroid, Sex steroid, Testosterone, Androgen
For several decades drugs have been one of the maj
or problems of society. There have been escalating costs spent on the war against drugs and countless dollars spent on rehabilitation, but the problem still exists. Not only has the drug problem increased but drug related problems are on the rise. Drug abuse is a killer in our country. Some are born addicts(crack babies), while others become users. The result of drug abuse is thousands of addicts in denial. The good news is the United States had 25,618 total arrests and 81,762 drug seizures due...

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Drug culture, Drug control law, Drug policy, Underground culture, Law, Substance abuse, Public health, Drug liberalization, Prohibition of drugs, Drug injection, War on Drugs, Heroin
Whether you call it Hemp, Mary Jane, Pot, Weed; it
doesn\'t matter. It is still Cannabis Sativa, or cannabis for short. And it is still illegal. The use of marijuana as an intoxicant in the United States became a problem of public concern in the 1930s. Regulatory laws were passed in 1937, and criminal penalties were instituted for possession and sale of the drug. "Marijuana" refers to the dried leaves and flowers of the cannabis plant, which contains the non-narcotic chemical THC at various potencies. It is smoked or eaten to produce the feelin...

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Entheogens, Medicinal plants, Euphoriants, Cannabis, Medicine, Health, Herbalism, Medical cannabis, Legality of cannabis, Marijuana, Entheogenic use of cannabis, Hemp
Marijuana originated in the middle east (Taiwan, K
orea). China plays an important part in Marijuana\'s history. Hoatho, the first chinese physician to use Cannabis for medical purposes as a painkiller and anesthetic for surgery. In the Ninth Century B.C., it was used as an incense by the Assyrians Herbal, a Chinese book of medicine from the second Century B.C., was first to describe it in print. It was used as an anesthetic 5,000 years ago in ancient china. Many (*) ancient cultures such as the persians, Greeks, East Indians, Romans, and the As...

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Cannabis, Medicinal plants, Entheogens, Cannabis smoking, Health, Medicine, Herbalism, Euphoriants, Medical cannabis, Legality of cannabis, Marijuana, Marihuana Tax Act
What Is Marijuana?
Marijuana, a drug obtained from dried and crumpled parts of the ubiquitous hemp plant Canabis sativa (or Cannabis indica). Smoked by rolling in tobacco paper or placing in a pipe. It is also otherwise consumed worldwide by an estimated 200,000,000 persons for pleasure, an escape from reality, or relaxation. Marijuana is known by a variety of names such as kif (Morocco), dagga (South Africa), and bhang (India). Common in the United States, marijuana is called pot, grass, weed, Mary Jane, bones,...

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Cannabis, Herbalism, Medicinal plants, Medicine, Health, Cannabis smoking, Drug culture, Legality of cannabis, Medical cannabis, Drug user, Effects of cannabis, Decriminalization of non-medical cannabis in the United States
The question of whether to legalize drugs or not i
s a very controversial and important issue. Drugs affect so many areas of society. "The U.S. population has an extremely high rate of alcohol and drug abuse" (Grolier). Several groups have formed and spoken out regarding their position. "Speaking Out Against Drug Legalization is the first step in helping to deliver the credible, consistent message about the risks and costs of the legalization of drugs to people in terms that make sense to them. The anti-legalization message is effective when com...

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Law, Foreign relations, Government, Drug culture, Drug control law, Prohibition of drugs, Drug liberalization, Drug user, Victimless crime, Illegal drug trade, Substance abuse, Drug Enforcement Administration
One of the biggest problems which the United State
s is faced with is juvenile crime. The reason experts feel juvenile’s commit crimes is because of risk factors when they were younger but experts still have not found the main reason why juvenile’s commit crimes. Some risk factors associated with juvenile crime are poverty, repeated exposure to violence, drugs, easy access to firearms, unstable family life and family violence, delinquent peer groups, and media violence. Especially the demise of family life, the effect of the media on...

505
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Criminology, Crime, Deviance sociology), Misconduct, Juvenile delinquency, Psychopathy, Juvenile justice system, Violence, Domestic violence, Research on the effects of violence in mass media, Juvenile delinquency in the United States, Trial as an adult
The Violence Against Women Act creates a right to
be "free from crimes of violence" that are gender motivated. It also gives a private civil right of action to the victims of these crimes. The Senate report attached to the act states that "Gender based crimes and fear of gender based crimes...reduces employment opportunities and consumer spending affecting interstate commerce." Sara Benenson has been abused by her husband, Andrew Benenson, since 1978. Because of this abuse, she sued her husband under various tort claims and violations under th...

967
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Supreme Court of the United States, Commerce Clause, United States v. Lopez, Violence Against Women Act, Katzenbach v. McClung, United States v. Morrison
In 1993 worldwide illegal copying of domestic and
international software cost $12.5 billion to the software industry, with a loss of $2.2 billion in the United States alone. Estimates show that over 40 percent of U.S. software company revenues are generated overseas, yet nearly 85 percent of the software industry\'s piracy losses occurred outside of the United States borders. The Software Publishers Association indicated that approximately 35 percent of the business software in the United States was obtained illegally, which 30 percent of the...

3477
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File sharing, Law, Intellectual property law, Monopoly, Computer law, Information, Computing, Copyright law, Copyright infringement, BSA, Copyright law of the United States, Copyright
Such an issue stirs up moral and religious beliefs
; beliefs that are contrary to what America should "believe". However, such a debate has been apparent in the American marketplace of ideas before with the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920\'s. With the illegality of alcohol the mafia could produce liquor and therefore had considerable control over those who wanted their substance and service. The role that the mafia played in the 1920\'s has transformed into the corner drug dealers and drug cartel of the 1990\'s. The justification that legaliz...

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Drug culture, Neurochemistry, Drug control law, Human behavior, Drug policy, Habits, Smoking, Psychiatric diagnosis, Drug liberalization, Prohibition of drugs, Substance abuse, Illegal drug trade
Censorship And The Intern
annon The freedom of speech that was possible on theInternet could now be subjected to governmental approvals. For example, China is attempting to restrict political expression, in the name of security and social stability. It requires users of the Internet an d electronic mail (e-mail) to register, so that it may monitor their activities.9 In the United Kingdom, state secrets and personal attacks are off limits on the Internet. Laws are strict and the government is extremely interested in regu...

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Content-control software, Internet censorship, Privacy, Freedom of speech, Censorship, Human rights, Politics, Propaganda
Drugs are a major influential force in our country
today. The problem has gotten so out of hand that many options are being considered to control it or even solve it. Ending the drug war seems to be a bit impossible. The war on drugs seems to be accomplishing a lot but this is not true. Different options need to be considered. Legalization is an option that hasn\'t gotten a chance but should be given one. Although many people feel that legalizing marijuana would increase the amount of use, marijuana should be legalized because it will reduce th...

745
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Drug policy, Drug culture, Drugs in the United States, Law, Drug control law, Drug policy of the United States, Cannabis in the United States, Cannabis, Legality of cannabis, Prohibition of drugs, War on Drugs, Drug user
The purpose of this paper is to discuss marijuana
and compare both sides of the issue of legalizing marijuana. We have two factions fighting each other; one those who are pro-marijuana and those who are anti-marijuana. These two factions have been fighting on this issue on the halls of justice for years. Pro marijuana legalization groups such as the Physician\'s Association for AIDS Care, National Lymphoma Foundation argue that marijuana should be legalized in order to treat terminally ill patients. Among them are AIDS victims who find that ma...

720
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Cannabis, Drugs in the United States, Cannabis in the United States, Decriminalization of non-medical cannabis in the United States, Legality of cannabis, Drug liberalization, Removal of cannabis from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act, Medical cannabis in the United States
Gun control, as we know it, consists of the govern
ment restricting the ability of individual citizens to purchase weapons. The different types of gun control vary from waiting periods between when you purchase the gun and when you actually get it, background checks so that high-risk people can\'t purchase guns through legal channels, and completely banning certain types of guns. There are countless ways for criminals to avoid these government regulations, causing them to only render the ability of innocent citizens protecting their home and fam...

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Gun politics, Firearms, Gun control, Automatic firearm, Politics, Ammunition, Gun violence in the United States, Ballistics, Gun shows in the United States
This essay was written to show the advantages and
disadvantages of the Young Offenders Act over the previous Juvenile Delinquents Act. Also it should give a theoretical understanding of the current Canadian Juvenile-Justice system, the act and it\'s implications and the effects of the young offenders needs and mental health on the outcome of the trials. In the interest of society the young offenders act was brought forth on april second 1984. This act was created to ensure the rights and the needs of a young person. Alan W. Leshied says "On on...

534
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Crime, Criminology, Criminal justice, Misconduct, Criminal law, Juvenile delinquency, Young offender, Youth Criminal Justice Act, Youth justice in England and Wales
Gangs are a violent reality that people have to de
al with in today\'s cities. What has made these groups come about? Why do kids feel that being in a gang is both an acceptable and prestigious way to live? The long range answer to these questions can only be speculated upon, but in the short term the answers are much easier to find. On the surface, gangs are a direct result of human beings\' personal wants and peer pressure. To determine how to effectively end gang violence we must find the way that these morals are given to the individual. Unf...

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Crime, Criminology, Urban decay, Deviance sociology), Misconduct, Gangs, Structure, Draft:Juvenile Female Gang Involvement, Female gangs in the United States
Prison inmates, are some of the most maladjusted
Prison inmates, are some of the most "maladjusted" people in society. Most of the inmates have had too little discipline or too much, come from broken homes, and have no self-esteem. They are very insecure and are "at war with themselves as well as with society" (Szumski 20). Most inmates did not learn moral values or learn to follow everyday norms. Also, when most lawbreakers are labeled criminals they enter the phase of secondary deviance. They will admit they are criminals or believe it when...

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Penology, Criminal law, Criminal justice, Crime, Criminology, Corrections, Justice, Halfway house, Prison, Deviance
The first act of America's anti-drug laws was in 1
The first act of America\'s anti-drug laws was in 1875. It outlawed the smoking of opium in opium dens. This was a San Francisco ordinance. The basis on passing this law was that Chinese men had a way of luring white women to their dens and causing their "ruin", which was the association with Chinese men. Later, other Federal laws such as trafficking in opium was illegal for anyone of Chinese origin. The opium laws were directed at the smoking of opium. The law didn\'t effect importation of the...

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Drug control law, Drug policy, Neurochemistry, Law, Drug culture, Euphoriants, Morphine, Opioids, Prohibition of drugs, Illegal drug trade, War on Drugs, Drug liberalization
The nineteen-seventies was an incredible decade. I
t was a decade of change, one of freedom, a time for great music. It was also an incredible decade for shock, fear and serial killers. John Wayne Gacy, an amateur clown, was a pedophiliac homosexual. He tortured and killed thirty three little boys and stored their remains under his house. David Berkowitz, a.k.a. the Son of Sam, stalked New York City from nineteen-sixty-seven to nineteen-seventy-seven. He claimed to have been following a voice from his dog that told him when and where to kill. Te...

735
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Crime, Murder, Psychopathy, Serial killer, Deviance sociology), Misconduct, Death, The Killers, Jack the Ripper, My Life Among the Serial Killers, Draft:In The Mind of a Serial Killer
It's the weekend, you have nothing to do so you de
It\'s the weekend, you have nothing to do so you decide to play around on your computer. You turn it on and then start up, you start calling people with your modem, connecting to another world, with people just like you at a button press away. This is all fine but what happens when you start getting into other peoples computer files. Then it becomes a crime, but what is a computer crime really, obviously it involves the use of a computer but what are these crimes. Well they are: Hacking, Phreaki...

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Computing, Hacker culture, Telephony, Culture, Phreaking, Hacker, Security hacker, Hacking, Digital DawgPound, StankDawg
During the past quarter century, abortion has join
ed race and war as one of the most debatable subjects of controversy in the United States. It discusses human interaction where ethics, emotions and law are combined. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemmas that focus many individuals to create an emotional and violent atmosphere. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are "pro-choice" and "pro-life". A pro-choice person would feel that the decision to abort a pregnancy is that of the mothers...

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Law, Abortion, Reproductive rights, Fertility, Human reproduction, RTT, United States pro-choice movement, Sexual reproduction, Roe v. Wade, Anti-abortion movements, Religion and abortion, Abortion debate
Border Patrol
annon The U.S. Border Patrol is the organization that polices the entry of illegal immigrants into our country. The official mission of the United States Border patrol is to protect the boundaries of the United States by preventing illegal entry, and by detecting, interdicting, and apprehending illegal aliens, smugglers, and contraband. Today, the United States Border Patrol consists of 21 sectors. Each sector is headed by a chief patrol agent. There are 145 stations located throughout the cont...

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Geography of the United States, MexicoUnited States border, Borders of the United States, Illegal immigration to the United States, United States, United States Border Patrol, Illegal immigration, Southwestern United States, Operation Gatekeeper, Illegal entry, Economic impact of illegal immigrants in the United States, United States v. Brignoni-Ponce
In Roman times, abortion and the destruction of un
wanted children was permissible, but as out civilization has aged, it seems that such acts were no longer acceptable by rational human beings, so that in 1948, Canada along with most other nations in the world signed a declaration of the United Nations promising every human being the right to life. The World Medical Association meeting in Geneve at the same time, stated that the utmost respect for human life was to be from the moment of conception. This declaration was re-affirmed when the World...

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Fertility, RTT, Human reproduction, Sexual reproduction, Abortion, Demography, Religion and abortion, Pregnancy, Right to life, Abortion debate, Abortion and Christianity
Many have pondered upon the meaning of abortion. T
he argument being that every child born should be wanted, and others who believe that every child conceived should be born (Sass vii). This has been a controversial topic for years. Many people want to be able to decide the destiny of others. Everyone in the United States is covered under the United States constitution, and under the 14th Amendment women have been given the choice of abortion. In 1973, Harry A. Blackmun wrote the majority opinion that it\'s a women\'s right to have an abortion....

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Abortion, Law, Abortion debate, Reproductive rights, United States pro-choice movement, Sexual reproduction, Religion and abortion, Roe v. Wade, Anti-abortion movements, Abortion in the United States, Abortion and Christianity
Abortion has been one of this country's most contr
Abortion has been one of this country\'s most controversial topic on hand. But if one sees the constitutional infringement to women by the restriction of abortion, the torment to the unwanted child and the anguish society has to sustain,then this topic would not be so debatable. Too many people do not see the cause and effect of not being able to have abortions. All human beings are given some inalienable right guaranteed by the Constitution. One of those privilege is the right to pursue happine...

342
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Abortion, Fertility, Human reproduction, RTT, Abortion debate, Sexual reproduction, Ethics, Demography, Abortion in Canada
During the past quarter century, abortion has join
ed race and war as one of the most debatable subject of controversy in the United States. It discusses human interaction where ethics, emotions and law come together. Abortion poses a moral, social and medical dilemma that faces many individuals to create a emotional and violent atmosphere. There are many points of view toward abortion but the only two fine distinctions are "pro-choice" and "pro-life". A pro-choicer would feel that the decision to abort a pregnancy is that of the mothers and the...

1373
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7
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Abortion, Reproductive rights, Law, Fertility, Human reproduction, RTT, Sexual reproduction, United States pro-choice movement, Roe v. Wade, Anti-abortion movements, Unsafe abortion, Religion and abortion
Abortion is a very controversial subject that has
been continually argued over for the past few years and probably many years to come. The main controversy is should abortion be legalized? First before we get into the many sides of abortion we must first define abortion. Abortion is the destruction of the fetus or unborn child while the child is still in the mothers womb. This can be done by almost anyone from the mother herself to back alley abortions and even to abortions by clinics set up especially for this purpose. There are two sides to...

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Reproductive rights, Abortion, Pro-choice movement, Law, Abortion in the United States, United States law, Abortion debate, United States pro-choice movement, Anti-abortion movements, Abortion and Christianity, Abortion in the United Kingdom
Many people believe abortion is a moral issue, but
it is also a constitutional issue. It is a woman\'s right to choose what she does with her body, and it should not be altered or influenced by anyone else. This right is guaranteed by the ninth amendment, which contains the right to privacy. The ninth amendment states: "The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people." This right guarantees the right to women, if they so choose, to have an abortion, up to the end...

770
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Reproductive rights, Law, Case law, Sexual revolution, Judicial activism, Roe v. Wade, United States law, Abortion debate, United States pro-choice movement, Abortion-rights movements, Planned Parenthood, Abortion
In recent years preferential hiring has become an
issue of great interest. Preferential hiring, which was devised to create harmony between the different races and sexes, has divided the lines even more. Supporters on both sides seem fixed in their positions and often refuse to listen to the other group\'s platform. In this essay, the recipients of preferential hiring will be either black or female, and the position in question will be a professorship on the university level. The hirings in question are cases that involve several candidates, a...

1945
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Social inequality, Politics, Discrimination, Structure, Race and society, Abuse, Anti-social behaviour, Social justice, Affirmative action, African-American Civil Rights Movement, Human skin color, Black people
The roots of affirmative action can be traced back
to the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act where legislation redefined public and private behavior. The act states that to discriminate in private is legal, but anything regarding business or public discrimination is illegal ("Affirmative" 13). There are two instances when opposing affirmative action might seem the wrong thing to do. Even these two cases don\'t justify the use of affirmative action. First is the nobility of the cause to help others. Second, affirmative action was a great start...

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Social inequality, Discrimination, Politics, Affirmative action, Race and society, Education policy, Conservatism in the United States, Reverse discrimination, Thomas Sowell, Equal employment opportunity, Policy debate, Affirmative action in the United States
Once upon a time, there were two people who went t
o an interview for only one job position at the same company. The first person attended a prestigious and highly academic university, had years of work experience in the field and, in the mind of the employer, had the potential to make a positive impact on the company’s performance. The second person was just starting out in the field and seemed to lack the ambition that was visible in his opponent. “Who was chosen for the job?” you ask. Well, if the story took place before 196...

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Discrimination, Social inequality, Race and society, Politics, Structure, Affirmative action, Reverse discrimination, Racism, Affirmative action in the United States, Libertarian perspectives on affirmative action
Capital Punishment has been part of the criminal j
ustice system since the earliest of times. The Babylonian Hammurabi Code(ca. 1700 B.C.) decreed death for crimes as minor as the fraudulent sale of beer(Flanders 3). Egyptians could be put to death for disclosing the location of sacred burial sites(Flanders 3). However, in recent times opponents have shown the death penalty to be racist, barbaric, and in violation with the United States Constitution as "...cruel and unusual punishment." In this country,although laws governing the application of...

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Crime, Capital punishment, Law, Penology, Social policy, Murder, Capital punishment debate in the United States, Capital punishment in the United States
Auditor Liability
annon Throughout the Eighties and into the Nineties thequestion of liability has become more prevalent in the practice of public accounting. Recently, the AICPA has been lobbying for liability reform in cases involving negligence or malpractice by public acco untants. Opposition to this lobbying has come from consumer advocacy organizations, trial lawyers\' associations, and state public interest groups to name a few. (Bolinger p. 53) The key to success for the AICPA, according to Gary M. Bolin...

2004
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Economy, Insurance, Financial institutions, Finance, Insurance industry, Indemnity, Medical malpractice in the United States, Liability insurance
Looking out for the state of the public’s sa
tisfaction in the scheme of capital sentencing does not constitute serving justice. Today’s system of capital punishment is frought with inequalities and injustices. The commonly offered arguments for the death penalty are filled with holes. “It was a deterrent. It removed killers. It was the ultimate punishment. It is biblical. It satisfied the public’s need for retribution. It relieved the anguish of the victim’s family.”(Grisham 120) Realistically, imposing the d...

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Penology, Crime, Criminal justice, Criminology, Justice, Law, Capital punishment, Social policy, Deterrence, Retributive justice, Punishment, Sentence
In the past, people have invariably felt that if t
hey had been wronged in some way, it was his or her right to take vengeance on the person that had wronged them. This mentality still exists, even today, but in a lesser form because the law has now outlined a person\'s rights and developed punishments that conform to those rights, yet allow for the retribution for their crime. However, some feel that those laws and punishments are too lax and criminals of today take advantage of them, ie. organized crime, knowing very well that the punishments...

791
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Crime, Criminal justice, Penology, Ethics, Criminology, Criminal law, Capital punishment, Law, Social policy, Punishment, Retributive justice, Murder
Capital Punishment deters murder, and is just Retr
ibution. Capital punishment, is the execution of criminals by the state, for committing crimes, regarded so heinous, that this is the only acceptable punishment. Capital punishment does not only lower the murder rate, but it\'s value as retribution alone is a good reason for handing out death sentences. Support for the death penalty in the U.S. has risen to an average of 80% according to an article written by Richard Worsnop, entitled "Death penalty debate centres on Retribution", this figure is...

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Capital punishment, Law, Penology, Social policy, Capital punishment debate in the United States, Philosophy of law, Crime, The Death Penalty: Opposing Viewpoints
Justice can not be served until the debate on capi
tal punishment is resolved and all states have come to agree that the death penalty is the best way to stop crime completely. "The bottom line is, one method of execution is just as brutal and as barbaric as the next," says Mr. Breedlove of the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty. This comes straight from the mouth of a member of a national organization against capital punishment. The American HeritageŽ Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition defines execution as The act or...

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Capital punishment, Law, Penology, Social policy, Justice, Philosophy of social science, Politics, Capital punishment debate in the United States, Religion and capital punishment
The Debate over the merits of capital punishment h
as endured for years, and continues to be an extremely indecisive and complicated issue. Adversaries of capital punishment point to the Marshalls and the Millgards, while proponents point to the Dahmers and Gacys. Society must be kept safe from the monstrous barbaric acts of these individuals and other killers, by taking away their lives to function and perform in our society. At the same time, we must insure that innocent people such as Marshall and Millgard are never convicted or sentenced to...

687
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Crime, Penology, Criminology, Criminal justice, Criminal law, Sex crimes, Capital punishment, Social policy, Deterrence, Punishment, Sex offender, Prison
In the eighteenth century,England would punish by
death for pickpocketing and petty theft. Ever since the 1650\'s colonist could be put to death for denying the true god or cursing their parents advocates. Capital Punishment have clashed almost continuously in the forum of public opinion in state legislatures and most recently in courts. In 1972,the case of furman vs.Georgia reached the supreme court. The court decided that punishment by death did indeed violate the eighth amendment to containing that "excessive fines imposed,nor cruel and unu...

560
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Crime, Penology, Criminal justice, Justice, Criminology, Capital punishment, Law, Social policy, Cruel and unusual punishment, Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Deterrence, Punishment
Capital punishment is the legal infliction the dea
th penalty. It is obviously the most severe form of criminal punishment. (Bedau1) Capital punishment is a controversial way of dealing with violent criminals. The main alternative to the death penalty is life in prison. Capital punishment has been around for thousands of years as a means of eradicating criminals. A giant debate started between supporters and opposers of execution, over the morality and effectiveness of the death penalty. The supporters claim that if you take a life you should pa...

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Capital punishment, Law, Penology, Social policy, Philosophy of law, Death, Capital punishment in the United States, Capital punishment in California
Canada's copyright law is one of our hardest laws
Canada\'s copyright law is one of our hardest laws to enforce. The reason the police have so much trouble enforcing this law, is due to technology. This law is very easy to break, and once broken, it is very hard to track down violators. So although some form of a copyright law is needed, the one we have has, too many holes to be effective. There are three main ways in which the copyright law is broken in everyday life. They is audio/video tape copying, plagiarism, and software piracy. The first...

794
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Law, Copyright law, File sharing, Intellectual property law, Information, Data, Copyright infringement, Organized crime, Tort law, Copyright law of the United States, Copyright, Copying
Our topic for this paper is Crime and Punishment.
There are several different issues on this subject. We chose three main points to talk about: The Crimes, the People who solved them, and the different types of punishments. These are the topics we chose for our report. Crime in the nineteeth century was rapid though out London. But because of all of the poverty and sickness in the streets, crime was the only way to survive. Most of the crimes that took place in London were crimes that involved stealing. Pickpocket gangs and street gamblers wer...

887
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Crime, London boroughs, Jack the Ripper, United Kingdom, Whitechapel, Criminal justice, Prison, Jack the Ripper suspects
Legalize Marijuana
annon I, for one, believe that Marijuana should be legalized. I have several reasons for this, the main one is that it would almost completely eliminate the crime and other problems associated with the drug. We would need fewer police officers looking for pot, we could concentrate drug education in schools on the more grievously damaging drugs (heroin, cocaine, LSD). The only long term effects marijuana has on a person are the same as with cigarettes. No one would dare prohibit the sale and pos...

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Cannabis, Legality of cannabis, Drugs in the United States, Cannabis in Oregon, Medical cannabis in the United States
Abuse of The Innocent
annon Is it right to force a mouse to live it\'s live in a laboratory cage to test anti-cancer drug? How would you like to be squeezed in a cage with many other animals, not being able to touch the grass, run around and play, smell the flowers, or go for a walk in the warmth of the sunshine? Animal cruelty is wrong because we are hurting the Innocent. Animals experience and feel pain, fear , anxiety, stress, depression, boredom, joy and happiness. Animals are very intelligent, some ever learn o...

693
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Animal welfare, Cruelty to animals, Anthrozoology, Medicine, Animal law, Crimes, Ethics, Onychectomy, Puppy mill
Woodrow Wilson Overview
The Life, duties and term of the 28th President of the United States, Woodrow (Thomas) Wilson. Wilson went to private schools his whole adolescent life. When Wilson went to college, he studied to be a politician. Later Wilson decided he wanted to become a lawyer, this failed so he enrolled in school to study history. Over time, Wilson gained a lot of respect and rose to high places because of his essays and public addresses. As the University President, Wilson resigned and looked into the Democ...

324
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American Presbyterians, Presidency of Woodrow Wilson, Freemen of the City of London, Woodrow Wilson, Wilson, 20th century in the United States, United States
Subject = Advanced Placement US History
subject = Advanced Placement US History title = Development of the West Beyond The Mississippi papers = Ryan Loker 1-6-96 AP US History Period 3 DEVELOPMENT OF THE WEST BEYOND THE MISSISSIPPI The years 1840 to 1890 were a period of great growth for the United States. It was during this time period that the United states came to the conclusion that it had a manifest destiny, that is, it was commanded by god to someday occupy the entire North American continent. One of the most ardent followers of...

884
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Americas, United States, American Old West, Aboriginal title in the United States, Economic history of the United States, International relations theory, Manifest destiny, Dawes Act, Homestead Acts, Midwestern United States, Battle of the Little Bighorn, Indian Country Jurisdiction
The Vietnam War is truly one of the most unique wa
rs ever fought by the Unites States of by any country. It was never officially declared a war (Knowll, 3). It had no official beginning nor an official end. It was fought over 10,000 miles away in a virtually unknown country. The enemy and the allies looked exactly the alike, and may by day be a friend but by night become an enemy (Aaseng 113). It matched the tried and true tactics of World War Two against a hide, run, and shoot technique known as "Guerrilla Warfare." It matched some of the best...

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Vietnam War, Military history by country, War, Military history, Tet Offensive, Viet Cong, South Vietnam, Vietnamization, Battle of Saigon
The Differences In The Social Classes Of Mid-Victo
rian England I. Introduction In the Mid-Victorian period in English history there were distinct class differences in its society. There were three classes in England. These were the Aristocracy, the Middle-Class (or Factory owners) and the working class. Each class had specific characteristics that defined its behavior. These characteristics were best seen in four areas of British society. During the time-period known by most historians as the Industrial Revolution, a great change overtook Briti...

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Ethics, Philosophy, Academia, Social classes, Classical liberalism, Social philosophy, Male feminists, Utilitarians, Working class, Middle class, French Revolution, Rebellion
The Rebellion Against Victorianism
The 1890\'s was in time for transformation for the English society. After Queen Victoria died the heart of the Victorian culture seemed to fade. England was beginning to experience economic competition from other states and a gradual decline from its former pinnacle of power. Politically, the Parliament experienced some fundamental power shifts after the turn of the century. This essay will address the climate of change in the English culture and its expressions. The changes occurred in two sep...

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British people, Social theories, Government of the United Kingdom, Politics, Political ideologies, Social movements, Knights of the Garter, Egalitarianism, Liberal Party, House of Lords, Victorian era, Winston Churchill