The Titanic is one of the greatest and most known boat disaster in history. On April 19, 1912, the Titanic was making good time towards New York, when it scraped against an iceberg. It sunk three hours later, before any boats could come and rescue the passengers still aboard. As we look back on the disaster today, we see many ways in which the tragedy might
have been prevented, or lessened in severity.

On April 19, the Titanic scraped against an iceberg leaving six big holes. They measured six feet long, six feet wide, and were located on the left side of the boat. The Titanic was originally designed so three of her twelve
air-tight compartments could be filled with water and she would still be able to float. When the holes were created though, six of the compartments were filled, and the boat began to sink (Titanic 1). Hours before they reached the danger zone, Titanic’s crew was warned several times about the ice, and
advised to slow down, or take another route. After two hours of the warnings, the wireless messaging system was turned off so that they would not have to listen to, or to the warnings, and they continued in the same direction at the same speed as
before (Ballard, Robert).
“The Titanic was a great ship at its time” said Rebecca Renkola (Kelly Thomas). “That is part of the reason why the disaster occurred. People thought it was unsinkable, so they made no special precautions.” For example, there were only the minimum required number of lifeboats aboard, and when the boat sank, the average number aboard was twenty-eight, when
the maximum capacity was sixty. The day before she sunk, the lifeboat drill was canceled because of the belief that the boat could and would not sink. “If they had had the lifeboat drill, more people might have been boarded into the
lifeboats, and more lives might have been saved,”said Rebecca Renkola (Kelly Thomas). Another way the disaster could have been prevented, was that if the crew had slowed the boat down, and not tried to show off by arriving early in New York, the boat might have been able to steer clear of the ice..

The belief most people have in how the Titanic sank, is because it hit an iceberg, Causing six holes, and then sank. But is that really what happened? According to a legend, the mummy of Princess of Amen-Ra, was thrown into the Nile River, and then found by four English men hundreds of years later. They transported the mummy to England, and within a week, every one of them died supposedly because of a curse. Once in England, the mummy was moved to a museum, but everyone who helped died just like the Four English men. Finally, after costing many lives, the mummy was placed on display. Still the restless spirit haunted the museum by ruining other exhibits,and
killing the watchman at night. Eventually, the museum management sold the mummy to an English collector. Knowing that it would not be taken aboard the boat, he arranged for it to be hidden in the body of an automobile which was also bound for New York. On the day of her maiden voyage, the English
man boarded with the boat with other first class passengers, and the voyage began.

On April 19, knowing that there was no way to discard the mummy, the English man told the other passengers about his cursed cargo. Immediately, the boat picked up its speed and changed course. In a few hours, the boat struck an iceberg and began to sink to its present position at the bottom of the

Atlantic Ocean. The boat’s name was the Titanic (Titanic 2).

The majority of the survivors were women and children. In the first class, 54 men and 145 women survived, leaving 119 men and 11 women dead. In the second class, 15 men and 104 women survived, but 142 men, and 24 women were never accounted for. In the third class, the number of surviving men was 69 and for women 105, but 417 men and 119 women lost their lives.

Titanic’s crew was made of 876 men, and the water 682 lives (Kelly Thomas). The Titanic disaster can teach us many things. One